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Displaying records 625 through 625 of 2180
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Title: Effect of compaction of soil on IM aggresiveness to buried ferrous metals
Category: Papers by Dr R A King
Downloadable: Yes 
Catalog No.: 733
Date of Publication: 1977
Price: $25.00 US
Authors: Dr R A King and K Palmer
Abstract: Prediction of the corrosion hazard of soils is based on prior field surveys of resistivity, redox, content and occasionally electrochemical tests. Very limited study has been made of the changes in soil corrosiveness firstly by disturbance of the soil, secondly by the effects of soil compaction on completion of pipeline laying. Laboratory test rigs were constructed and three different soil compactions employed. Parameters measured were resistivity, redox potential, metal to soil potential and polarization behaviour, over a period of fifty days, at four different depths. Increased compaction caused a decrease in resistivity, redox potential, metal to soil potential and also the corrosion current density as observed by polarization. The implications of these changes in measured soil parameters and how they change with time are that increasing compaction of disturbed soil increased the apparent corrosion hazard as decided by resistivity, redox and metal soil potential, but that the actual corrosion rate depends on depth below the surface and frequency and quantity of watering (i.e. rainfall). Prior soil surveys can lead to underprotection; adequate protection requires consideration of the effects of changes occuring to the recognized parameters of soil aggressiveness with time and compaction. The results are discussed with reference to practical problems of field measurement and design of protection systems.
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