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Title: Collapse of steel pipes under external pressure and axial tension
Category: Technical papers from Pipes & Pipelines International
Downloadable: Yes 
Catalog No.: 2243s
Date of Publication: Dec 1 2011 12:00AM
Price: $25.00 US
Authors: Dr Rita G Toscano and Dr Eduardo N Dvorkin
Abstract: IT IS WELL KNOWN that, when steel pipes are subjected to axial tensile loads, their external collapse pressure diminishes. When calculating the collapse pressure of casings using the standard API 5C3, even though the formulas are not applicable for axial tensile stresses up to the material yield stress, it is clear that the predicted collapse pressure tends to zero when the applied axial tensile stress tends to the material yield stress (see Figs 1 to 3). When calculating the collapse pressure of subsea pipeline systems using the standard DNV OS-F101, the external collapse pressure is zero when the applied axial tensile stress equals the material yield stress.

However, it has been observed that even when the applied axial tensile stress matches the material yield stress, there is still a remaining capacity in the pipes for carrying external pressure [1]. In this paper we investigate the above assertion and quantify, using finite-element models, the collapse of steel pipes that are first subjected to axial tensile load and afterwards to external pressure.

The finite-element analyses that we present here confirm that, even when the applied axial tensile load matches the material yield load, there still remains a not-negligible capacity in the pipes for carrying external pressure.

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